Monday, July 20, 2015

Terminal fix - desirable output

Use if clear does not work or the terminal does not show the output in the screen in a clear manner use this following command to fix this.

TERM=vt100; export $TERM

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

NTP leap second fix - Red Hat stuff

Resolve Leap Second Issues in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Leap seconds are a periodic one-second adjustment of Coordinated Universal Time(UTC) in order to keep a system's time of day close to the mean solar time. However, the Earth's rotation speed varies in response to climatic and geological events, and due to this, UTC leap seconds are irregularly spaced and unpredictable. This article seeks to provide information regarding the leap seconds themselves, along with addressing how Red Hat Enterprise Linux handles the insertion of one.

The next leap second insertion is scheduled for June 30th, 2015 at 23:59:60 UTC.

Systems running any version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux should automatically account for leap second corrections if they are using the NTP (Network Time Protocol) daemon to synchronize their local timekeeping with an NTP server. During the last day before a leap second correction, NTP servers should notify their clients that a leap second will occur, and at 23:59:59 UTC, the Linux kernel should add or remove an extra second by making the 60th second occur twice or removing it entirely.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Delete the file and checking the error status - shellscript

This script uses command line arguments ($1 and  $?) and tail out the /root/error.txt file.

#!/bin/bash
#usage of command line arguments
rm $1 2>>/root/error.txt
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
then
echo " Success "
else
tail -1 /root/error.txt
fi

Sleep command - an example shell script

The following script clear screen and update the date every second. So it seems like the running digital clock.

#!/bin/bash
#running digital clock
while [ : ]
do
clear
date
sleep 1
done

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Simple one line script for checking the file existence.


A single line script / command to find the particular file exists or not.
# test -f a.txt && echo "File exists" || echo "File does not exist"

Simple shell script to find out the file exists or not

Script
#!/bin/bash
#name: filecheck.sh
#simple script to find out the file exists or not
if [ -f $1 ]
then
echo " $1 exists "
else
echo " $1 does not exist"
fi
Script usage: ./filecheck filename

Ubuntu 15.04 general features

Well, here we are. After six busy months, one beta and a bunch of minor changes, the final stable release of Ubuntu 15.04 is now ready for you to download.

The bug fixes, improvements in usability and a fresh serving of software updates add up to a somewhat substantive total, creating a release that feels more polished than ever.

Enough chatter. Let’s dive in and see what’s new in Ubuntu 15.04.

Ubuntu 15.04 – New Features

Systemd
‘You may notice a change in boot speed [because of Systemd]…’
The headline change in Ubuntu 15.04 is the introduction of the Systemd init system at boot-time.

This is the software that initializes (hence the name ‘init’) first when booting, and handles loading of the various modules and background processes that make much of a modern computer operating system do what it needs to.

Ubuntu previously used Upstart, its own custom-made Init system, at boot time. When Debian, the Linux distribution that Ubuntu is built upon, chose to adopt Systemd Ubuntu understandably fell in line.

Upstart is available in 15.04. It’s included as a fallback in GRUB and is used for controlling user sessions.

The merits (or lack thereof) of the switch are largely moot for the less technically minded. It is possible that some users will notice a slight change in boot speed depending on their configuration.

Unity 7.3
Locally Integrated Menus Are Now Default
Menus can now be set to ‘always show’
The Unity desktop environment used by default in Ubuntu 15.04 receives a handful of small refinements, most of which aim to either fix bugs or correct missteps in earlier versions.

For example, application menus can now be set to ‘Always Show’.

Yeah; you no longer have to push your mouse to the top of the screen to show the ‘File’, ‘Edit’, ‘Help’, etc menus — not if you don’t want to.

If you prefer having your applications menus available inside application windows use the toggle in System Settings > Appearance > Behaviour to set things up how you like.

These “locally integrated menus”, introduced in 14.10, also support the ‘Always Show’ feature and showing up on mouseover of unfocused windows.

Other improvements to Unity in Vivid Vervet include a fix for showing the overlay elements (HUD, Dash, etc) over fullscreen windows and small adjustments to the speed of login and logout animations.

Compiz 0.9.12
Powering the Unity desktop experience is Compiz, the tried-and-trusted window manager. In keeping with the rest of this release the changes it gets are modest and made up of bug fixes and compatibility with alternative desktop environments.

Ubuntu Linux Kernel 3.19
While not based on the latest version of the Linux Kernel Ubuntu 15.04 ships with a modified version of 3.19.3 one. Expect a few updates to the most recent 3.19.x patch releases shortly after release.

Application Updates
music-rhythmbox
New and updated apps feature, including Rhythmbox
You’ll also find updated versions many of Ubuntu’s default apps, including the latest Firefox web-browser and Thunderbird e-mail client, a new version of the Rhythmbox music player plus an entirely revamped Totem video player.

LibreOffice 4.4
Firefox 37
Thunderbird 31.6
Shotwell 0.20.2
Nautilus 3.14.2
Evince 3.14.2
Rhythmbox 3.1
Totem 3.14.1
GNOME Terminal 3.14
New Default Wallpaper
suru desktop wallpaper ubuntu vivid

The new Ubuntu 15.04 Wallpaper
Ubuntu’s default wallpaper choice is irrelevant to some, integral to others. Whatever side of the fence you sit on the new wallpaper is palatable enough. After all: first impressions count.

Expect to see this new design flash up in various ‘Ubuntu in the wild’ posts over the next six months!

Ubuntu Make
Having been formally introduced in last October’s release the ‘Ubuntu Developer Tools Center’ has undergone a number of changes for Vivid, including being renamed as the more memorable ‘Ubuntu Make’.

Ubuntu Make simplifies the process of installing a host of developer-focused tools, editors, libraries and software development kits including the Android SDK, IDEA, PyCharm, and the new Firefox Developer Edition.


Improvements to the way library managers behave now allows multiple system libraries to be run/used without conflict.